THE RAM

THE RAM

The Sacred Ram, or Aries, is considered a manifestation of the Sun-god and its creative power; a symbol of the resurrected Sun. Aries heralded the end of the season of death, and was thus also a symbol of fertility, new life and creative energy.  The Ram was chosen as a natural symbol of resurrection because of its ability, when shaved, to replenish its stock of wool. The frontal view of the Ram's horns recalls the shape of a spiral, the symbol of eternity. The Ram has been a long held symbol of determination, action, initiative, and leadership.

THE FALCON

THE FALCON

Dating back to ancient times, the Falcon represented a higher vision, or higher knowledge in solving current life dilemmas. The Falcon was a solar emblem for success, victory and rising above a situation. It also represented visionary power, wisdom, and guardianship. This powerful bird was thought to awaken visionary power, leading you to your life purpose. Further evidence of its solar influence, the Falcon was symbolic of the rising sun in ancient Mesopotamia. It was also considered the king of all birds where many gods were shown with the head or body of the Falcon.

THE BULL

THE BULL

From the earliest of times, the bull was considered a divine animal and was a symbol of the moon, fertility, rebirth, and even royal power for many cultures. The horns of the bull represented the crescent moon.  The sacred bull, whose elaborate portrayals were found at Çatal Huyuk as early as 7000 BCE, shows that their religious beliefs were focused on death and rebirth.

THE LION

THE LION

Bronze Age cultures focused their symbolic displays on the remaining powerful and dangerous animals of the region this included big cats such as lions and leopards.  By comparing themselves to the most powerful and ferocious carnivores of the land, leaders placed themselves symbolically at the top of the natural hierarchy, serving to legitimize their leadership role and their military prowess. Lions were used by the elites as an almost universal symbol for kingly strength and political power. 

THE OWL

THE OWL

The owl represented a symbol of wisdom and the ability to see and hear what others may miss.  With its protective gaze and ability to go unseen, the owl was considered an ideal messenger of secrets and omens. The owl was also revered for its ability to see the soul. In ancient times, three hoots from the owl were thought to be a sign of the end of a difficult situation or phase.

THE DRAGON

THE DRAGON

Early cultures embraced dragons as a symbol of the bringing of plenitude, which affected rainfall, fruitfulness, rebirth, prosperity, strength, and power. Dragons were thought to be supernatural creatures that ruled the skies. With power over of the clouds, it was believed that when a dragon swallowed the moon (i.e. when the clouds covered the moon), this brought rains of prosperity. Along with the legend, the dragon represented bountiful harvests and luck.

THE LION

THE LION

Bronze Age cultures focused their symbolic displays on the remaining powerful and dangerous animals of the region this included big cats such as lions and leopards.  By comparing themselves to the most powerful and ferocious carnivores of the land, leaders placed themselves symbolically at the top of the natural hierarchy, serving to legitimize their leadership role and their military prowess. Lions were used by the elites as an almost universal symbol for kingly strength and political power. 

THE LABRYS

THE LABRYS

Labrys is the term for a symmetric double-headed axe that was introduced in Anatolia, where such symbols have been found in Catalhoyuk dating from the Neolithic age. The double-headed axe was often found in the hands of Teshub, the Hurrian skygod and storm, representing his strength and power. Along with its symbolism of sacred power, it was common to find ancient depictions of the labyrs between the horns of a bull or a cow, suggesting the belief that bulls and cows were all-powerful and placed in high regard.